What Can I Do With A Degree In Marketing?

Marketing careers span the range of industries and employers, from public or private corporations, government entities, and nonprofit organizations. Specializations can be equally wide ranging, from fashion and food to pharmaceuticals and sports. Marketers may focus on topics like brand management, product development, social media, technology or global markets. Marketing campaigns typically depend on product, price, place and promotion; similarly, marketing careers and opportunities can vary by industry and location.

Most management positions in marketing require a bachelor’s degree in marketing. Advertising positions may require a bachelor’s degree in advertising or journalism. Marketing professionals usually work for corporates, manufacturing companies, wholesale traders as well as advertising and public relations services. Having skills in creativity and communication as well as the ability to think analytically can be a good fit for those seeking a career in this field.

Here are a few career options you have as a marketing professional:

Advertising managers create advertising campaigns within a stipulated budget in order to generate interest among consumers. In larger companies advertising managers may handle several in-house accounts and have oversight on the creatives and media department.

Promotions managers design advertising campaigns that offer consumers an incentive to purchase. These incentives may include discounts, coupons, samples, in order to promote sales.

Marketing managers help to maximize profits for the company and ensure customers are satisfied. They often work with other departments, including sales, public relations and product development, to identify competitors and potential markets for growth.

Career Outlook for Marketing Professionals

The job outlook in marketing is strong, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The job outlook for advertising, promotions, and marketing managers from 2016 to 2026 is 10 percent (faster than the average for all other occupations), while the job outlook for marketing research analysts is 23 percent (much faster than average).

Wages for Marketing Professionals

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (May, 2017), the following are the mean annual wages for marketing professionals:

  • Advertising and Promotions Manager: $123,880
  • Marketing Managers: $145,620

Online Degrees in Marketing

Prospective students interested in earning a degree in this field — but who don’t have the time to become a full-time on-campus student — can consider earning an online degree in marketing. Online degree programs in marketing are just as rigorous and comparable to on-campus programs.

An online degree in marketing can teach students the fundamental lessons needed to begin a marketing career in any industry. Depending on the program you choose, coursework may include:

  • Consumer behavior
  • Communication methods and technology
  • Business law
  • Finance
  • Computer science
  • Visual arts and statistics

The professors that teach marketing generally have industry-specific experience that students can benefit from. Potential employers tend to value candidates who have a degree in marketing as it shows them that you are serious about this profession and come with the credentials needed to learn and grow in your profession.

Learn more about the field of marketing, as well as related career paths, in our infographic below. We examine popular careers and major employers as well as some thriving industries and hot locations for marketing pursuits.

Sources:

  • Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2017, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/advertising-promotions-and-marketing-managers.htm
  • Advertising and Promotions Managers, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2017, Occupational Employment Statistics, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes112011.htm#st
  • Marketing Managers, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2017, Occupational Employment Statistics, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes112021.htm#st
  • For a complete list of sources, please view the infographic.

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To Get A Degree, Or Not To Get A Degree

A media buzz has caused some people to question one longstanding pillar of American culture: the value of a higher education. Prospective students hear accounts of self-made billionaires such as Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs who eschewed the familiar trajectory of success and dropped out of school. The New York Times reported that since 1985, consumer prices have roughly doubled, but college tuition has skyrocketed 559 percent during that same time. In light of these developments, do people believe that a degree is worth the investment of time, effort and money?  The answer is a resounding YES. Not only are occupations that require increasingly advanced degrees on the rise according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), but also Americans still subscribe strongly to the value of a college education.

A new study by Northeastern University found that more than two-thirds of adults in the U.S. deem a college degree very important for finding a job, getting promotions, developing personally, gaining a global perspective, having success throughout life, and ultimately achieving the American dream. They also found that Millennials (aged 18-30) are more likely than other Americans to be in support of an emergent trend in higher learning: online education. A new study of 2,820 active, degree-granting schools found that the proportion of students taking at least one online course is at an all-time high of 32%. And this upward trend shows no signs of waning.

This infographic examines the continuing importance of a college education to all Americans and the blossoming reputation of online degrees, especially among young adults.

Sources:

“Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States,” Babson Survey Research Group, 2013, http://www.onlinelearningsurvey.com/reports/changingcourse.pdf

Northeastern University: Innovation in Higher Education Survey Toplines, Northeastern University, http://www.northeastern.edu/innovationsurvey/pdfs/survey-results.pdf

Why Tuition Has Skyrocketed at State Schools, The New York Times, March 2012, http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/02/why-tuition-has-skyrocketed-at-state-schools/?_r=0

For a complete list of sources, please view the infographic.

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What Can You Do With A Degree In Computer Science?

With our increasing use of and dependence on the internet, social media, smart phones and other smart devices, it should come as no surprise that there is an increasing emphasis on computer science literacy. A report titled ‘2019 State of Computer Science Education’ that was released by Code.org and the Computer Science Teachers Association describes how states have allocated more than $123 million for professional development in computer science from 2016 to 2021.

An online degree in computer science can ensure you are equipped with the knowledge and skills relevant in current computer science and information technology occupations. Students with good mathematical abilities, ingenuity and who can think analytically may be well-suited to such occupations.

What are the jobs in computer science by degree level?

To pursue a career in computer science and information technology, you may first complete a computer science degree program chosen based on your career goals, timeline and financial commitment possible.

  • Certificate Programs in Computer Science: Technical certification that may be provided by software vendors and vendor-neutral certification providers may take up to six months to complete. Students may learn about specific tools or products or gain an overview of computer science principles.

Jobs: Certification usually allows students to secure entry-level employment as computer support specialists, helpdesk technical support, visual basic developers and multimedia developers. With experience, they can secure roles as network and computer systems administrators and software developers.

  • Associate Degree in Computer Science: This qualification may generally equip students with a broad skill set suited to a variety of professions.

Jobs: Graduates may be eligible for roles as computer network support specialists, web developers, computer programmers, network and computer systems administrators, and computer systems analysts.

  • Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science: You can build a strong theoretical foundation and gain a variety of practical skills through this four-year degree program.

Jobs: Graduates may apply for positions as back-end web developers, software developers, computer network architects, computer programmers, computer systems analysts, information security analysts, database administrators and so on.

  • Master’s Degree in Computer Science: If you are interested in learning about advanced computer science topics, this two-year degree program can be the right choice for you! This may give you an option of choosing an area of concentration as well.

Jobs: Graduates can gain employment as database administrators, software development engineers, and computer and information research scientists. They are also usually eligible for leadership roles in other related professions.

  • Doctoral Degree in Computer Science: Doctoral degrees in computer science such as a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree can qualify you for scientific research in the field as well as for a professional management role.

Jobs: Doctoral degree graduates may pursue careers as university professors and research and development scientists.

To become a computer scientist, you may first need to complete a suitable degree program in computer science from an accredited institution. Generally, a master’s degree is the minimum qualification needed. Some employers typically require you to complete certification in a particular product or tool. Once employed, you can rise in your role as you gain work experience. You can take specific courses depending on the field you work in. In some professional roles, an additional Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree may help you rise to senior positions. It is also important to stay up to date with the latest developments as the field of computer science is rapidly changing. Periodically taking courses and attending IT conferences can also be beneficial.

How can you earn a computer science degree online?

An online degree program in computer science may enable students to set their own pace, thus giving them the flexibility needed to attend to their personal life, professional responsibilities and education. Some programs can be available in a hybrid format and may require some classes to be attended in person. Classes are typically conducted online asynchronously through online learning platforms. Students may be required to meet deadlines for assignment or meet the instructor online from time to time. Many colleges and universities usually allow online students access to digital library resources and other student support services such as counseling, tutoring and career guidance.

Learn more about careers in nursing through the infographic below.

Sources

  • Code.org, ‘Computing occupations are now the #1 source of new wages in America’, https://blog.code.org/post/144206906013/computing-occupations-are-now-the-1-source-of-new, May 22, 2016, accessed September 2019
  • 2019 State of Computer Science Education, Equity and Diversity, Code.org, https://advocacy.code.org/2019_state_of_cs.pdf, accessed September 2019
  • EducationDive, ’33 states adopted 57 computer science ed policies since 2018′, https://www.educationdive.com/news/33-states-adopted-57-computer-science-ed-policies-since-2018/562530/ , September 11, 2019, accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer and Information Technology Occupations, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/home.htm , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer Support Specialists, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-support-specialists.htm#tab-1 , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Web Developers, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/web-developers.htm#tab-1 , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Information Security Analysts, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/information-security-analysts.htm#tab-1 , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Software developers, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/software-developers.htm#tab-1 , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer and Information Research Scientists, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-and-information-research-scientists.htm#tab-1 , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer Network Architects, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-network-architects.htm#tab-1 , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer Programmers, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-programmers.htm#tab-1 , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer Systems Analysts, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-systems-analysts.htm#tab-1 , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Database Administrators, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/database-administrators.htm#tab-1 , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Network and Computer Systems Administrators, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/network-and-computer-systems-administrators.htm#tab-1 , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Computer User Support Specialists, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes151151.htm#st , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Web Developers, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes151134.htm#st , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Information Security Analysts, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes151122.htm#st , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Software Developers, Applications, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes151132.htm#st , accessed September 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Computer and Information Research Scientists, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes151111.htm#st , accessed September 2019

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What Can You Do With A Degree In Accounting?

The health of any organization is determined by the health of its finances. This is why qualified and competent accountants and other finance professionals are indispensable to any organization. Accountants may be required to analyze financial records, prepare and audit financial statements, and to give advice related to accounting systems and operations and other financial matters.

The demand for accountants, auditors and other accounting professionals is rising, possibly fueled by globalization, a growing economy, and tax and regulatory complexities. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the employment of accountants and auditors is predicted to grow 10 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations.

An online degree in accounting may help students develop the financial acumen they need to succeed in accounting professions. Students may develop essential skills in math, analysis, organization and communication. Individuals who like to work with data, solve problems, lead projects and have the ability to make decisions may find a career in accounting fulfilling.

Career paths in accounting by degree level

With the right qualifications, graduates with online degrees in accounting may secure positions as accountants, auditors, financial analysts, financial managers and so on. Individuals interested in careers in accounting may choose degree programs based on their career aspirations as well as the time and money they are able to commit to investing.

Accountants and Auditors

Accountants and auditors primarily handle financial records and taxes. Their employment is expected to grow 10 percent from 2016 to 2026, adding about 139,900 jobs.

Degree level required: These occupations typically require at least a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field. Some employers may prefer master’s degree graduates. Certifications such as certified public accountant (CPA) and certified information systems auditor (CISA) may help to enhance career prospects.

Financial Analysts

Financial analysts examine the performance of various investments and provide guidance in making investment decisions. An 11 percent rise in the employment of financial analysts from 2016 to 2026, adding about 32,000 jobs, is predicted by the BLS.

Degree level required: A bachelor’s degree in accounting or in a similar field is usually required. A license is generally required to sell financial products. An additional certification as a chartered financial analyst (CFA) may help advance one’s career.

Financial managers

Financial managers generally develop strategies and plans for the long-term financial goals of their organization. Their employment is expected to grow 19 percent from 2016 to 2026, adding about 108,600 jobs.

Degree level required: A bachelor’s or master’s degree in accounting, finance, economics, or business administration is typically required for financial managers. Further certification such as chartered financial analyst (CFA) or certified treasury professional are an asset.

Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks

They typically prepare financial records for businesses and other organizations and are expected to continue to be in demand.

Degree level required: Individuals with some postsecondary education and equipped with basic math and computer skills, including knowledge of spreadsheets and bookkeeping software, may be eligible for these roles. Most technical skills can be acquired on the job. Some clerks may seek certifications such as those of certified bookkeeper (CB) or certified public bookkeeper (CPB).

Financial clerks

Financial clerks typically carry out administrative tasks such as maintaining financial records, conducting financial transactions and aiding customers in the same. Around 127,900 jobs are expected to become available from 2016 to 2026.

Degree level required: Individuals with a high school diploma or an equivalent qualification may be eligible to apply for positions as financial clerks.

How to become an accountant

To become an accountant, you may need to graduate from an accredited institution with a degree in accounting or in a subject such as business administration with a concentration in accounting. You may gain practical experience through internships with public accounting or business firms.

You may be required to obtain appropriate licensure or certification that qualifies you to perform specific responsibilities. Certification may enable you to practice a specific specialty or advance to more senior positions. Accountants who file reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) are legally required to be Certified Public Accountants (CPAs).

In some cases, junior level accounting professionals may acquire skills on the job and advance to more senior roles based on their experience.

How can you earn an accounting degree online?

The coursework required for most accounting degrees is theoretical. Therefore, a degree in accounting may be acquired conveniently in an online format. This allows participants the flexibility to attend to professional or family commitments while pursuing their education.

Most classes are conducted asynchronously. Students may access relevant course materials including videos through the institution’s online learning platform. Assignments usually have deadlines. Some courses may require occasional real-time online attendance for peer discussions or tutorials. Some degree programs may require students to complete an internship or work experience at an approved organization.

Many colleges and universities that offer accounting degree programs through distance education may provide online students with access to a digital library, counseling services, tutoring, and career guidance. You can look up various online degree programs in accounting on the Internet and compare the curricula, tuition and student support services available or you can visit our page on online accounting degree programs and check out our ranking of the best online colleges for accounting.

Learn more about careers in accounting with the help of the infographic below.

Sources

  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Accountants and Auditors, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/accountants-and-auditors.htm#tab-1 , accessed June 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Financial Analysts, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/financial-analysts.htm#tab-1 , accessed June 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Financial Managers, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/financial-managers.htm#tab-1 , accessed June 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/office-and-administrative-support/bookkeeping-accounting-and-auditing-clerks.htm#tab-1 , accessed June 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Financial Clerks, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/office-and-administrative-support/financial-clerks.htm#tab-1 , accessed June 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Accountants and Auditors, https://www.bls.gov/oes/2018/may/oes132011.htm , accessed June 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Financial Analysts, https://www.bls.gov/oes/2017/may/oes132051.htm , accessed June 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Financial Managers, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes113031.htm , accessed June 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes433031.htm , accessed June 2019
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Financial Clerks, All Other, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes433099.htm , accessed June 2019

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To Get A Degree, Or Not To Get A Degree

A media buzz has caused some people to question one longstanding pillar of American culture: the value of a higher education. Prospective students hear accounts of self-made billionaires such as Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs who eschewed the familiar trajectory of success and dropped out of school. The New York Times reported that since 1985, consumer prices have roughly doubled, but college tuition has skyrocketed 559 percent during that same time. In light of these developments, do people believe that a degree is worth the investment of time, effort and money?  The answer is a resounding YES. Not only are occupations that require increasingly advanced degrees on the rise according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), but also Americans still subscribe strongly to the value of a college education.

A new study by Northeastern University found that more than two-thirds of adults in the U.S. deem a college degree very important for finding a job, getting promotions, developing personally, gaining a global perspective, having success throughout life, and ultimately achieving the American dream. They also found that Millennials (aged 18-30) are more likely than other Americans to be in support of an emergent trend in higher learning: online education. A new study of 2,820 active, degree-granting schools found that the proportion of students taking at least one online course is at an all-time high of 32%. And this upward trend shows no signs of waning.

This infographic examines the continuing importance of a college education to all Americans and the blossoming reputation of online degrees, especially among young adults.

Sources:

“Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States,” Babson Survey Research Group, 2013, http://www.onlinelearningsurvey.com/reports/changingcourse.pdf

Northeastern University: Innovation in Higher Education Survey Toplines, Northeastern University, http://www.northeastern.edu/innovationsurvey/pdfs/survey-results.pdf

Why Tuition Has Skyrocketed at State Schools, The New York Times, March 2012, http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/02/why-tuition-has-skyrocketed-at-state-schools/?_r=0

For a complete list of sources, please view the infographic.

What Can I Do With A Degree In Graphic Design?

Are you creative and tech-savvy? Do you like collaborating with teams? If so, you may want to explore the field of graphic design. As a graphic designer, you may have opportunities to communicate your message through an array of media, including:

  • Comics
  • Candy wrappers
  • Ads on city buses
  • Online videos
  • TV commercials
  • Billboards
  • Posters
  • Company logos

The many options for learning about graphic design include associate, bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in graphic design. Some PhD programs exist, although they are less common. If you are currently working or have family obligations that keep you from a full-time campus program, you can still earn an online graphic design degree. Make sure to enroll in an accredited program and one that is designed to give you a good balance of theory and hands-on experience. Studies could include web design, photography, typography, illustration or studio art. Design professionals usually rely on computer software applications, so your education program will typically blend art and technology. Related majors include digital arts, commercial design and advertising art.

Careers with a graphic design degree

Graphic design impacts many aspects of our visual world from print publications to websites to signage — and career opportunities can be equally diverse. With the right skills, graphic design majors can seek opportunities doing work in:

  • Web publishing
  • Marketing and promotions
  • Corporate communications
  • Advertising

An online graphic design degree can also open up opportunities in other specializations such as:

  • Print publications
  • Online marketing
  • Entertainment

What do graphic designers do?

These artistic professionals create carefully tailored messages using images, color, shape, typeface, size and other elements designed to elicit a particular response in viewers. Designers use their full arsenal of artistic tricks and technical tools to create visual effects for a wide range of industries, organizations and clients.

How much do graphic designers make?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) in May 2016, graphic designers made an annual median salary of $47,640. If you have a degree and become a professional in the field, the top 10 percent of graphic designers can make more than $82,000 yearly.

According to the BLS, the following states have the highest annual mean wage:

  • Washington D.C.: $69,490
  • New York: $62,750
  • California: $59,210
  • Maryland: $58,590
  • Massachusetts: $58,210

Overall, the BLS reports that between 2016 and 2026, the need for graphic designers is projected to grow approximately 5 percent – lower than the national average -so there may be stiff competition for graphic design careers. However, obtaining a degree and finding valuable experience can be helpful steps to take toprepare you for this competitive field.

  • “How do design programs differ?” American Institute of Graphics Arts (AIGA), 2017, http://www.aiga.org/guide-designprogramsdiffer/
  • Graphic Designers, Occupational Employment and Wages 2016, Bureau of Labor Statistics, http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes271024.htm
  • Graphic Designers, Occupational Outlook Handbook 2016, Bureau of Labor Statistics, http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Arts-and-Design/Graphic-designers.htm

 

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What Can I Do With A Degree In History?

If you want to learn about the complex relationship between humankind and the material world, cultures, societies, civilizations, and more, in a way that combines facts with storytelling, a degree in history may be the option for you.

Students of history learn to develop critical-thinking and strong analytical skills. As history is a research-intensive subject, it can also refine research and writing skills. Students develop strong communication abilities and learn how to make convicting, cohesive arguments. This flexible skill set can enable them to work across sectors like law, education, research, politics, government departments, writing, and even business.

Career options for history majors based on degree levels

A love for history isn’t enough of a reason to declare a major — you also need to consider what careers you can pursue with a degree in history, and whether those careers are right for you. Luckily, you’ve got plenty of options.

History majors can work across industries, career options and positions. Certain career paths may require students to pursue further education. Here are some common occupations for history majors, along with their projected job growth and average annual wages, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (2017).

Postsecondary History Teacher:

With an increasing number of students seeking higher education to enhance their careers, colleges and universities are expected to hire more full-time and part-time teachers to meet this increase in demand.

  • Projected employment growth rate (2016-26): 10 percent
  • Average annual wage: $82,900

Archivist

Public and private organizations require people who can organize large volumes of records and information, preserve them, and make them easily accessible. For this purpose, archivists are needed in a variety of organizations such as in museums, universities, government institutions, libraries and hospitals, to name a few.

  • Projected employment growth rate (2016-26): 14 percent
  • Average annual wage: $55,470

Curator

Curators are responsible for the selection, storage, and exhibition of artifacts in cultural institutions, such as museums and galleries. Their job responsibilities often include duties such as marketing, managing public relations, and fundraising, among others.

  • Projected employment growth rate (2016-26): 14 percent
  • Average annual wage: $58,830

Jobs with a history major by degree level

Associate degree in history may lead to a job as a:

  • Teacher’s assistant
  • Library assistants,
  • Administrative assistant
  • Tour guides

With a bachelor’s degree you may be able to work as a:

  • High school teacher
  • Museum technician
  • Writer
  • Editor
  • Public relations manager

A master’s degree in history may lead to occupations like:

  • Historian
  • Archivist
  • Museum curator
  • Teaching positions in colleges

A doctoral degree in history can lead to careers in academia and research.

These are just a few of your options after earning a degree in history. Individuals with history majors have gone into diverse occupations, from standup comedians to U.S. presidents.

Benefits of an online degree program in history

Online degree programs can provide students with the time flexibility they need to balance studies with work, family or other responsibilities. Such programs use the power of technology to provide a rigorous education that is at par with their on-campus equivalents. As most online degree programs are self-paced or asynchronous in nature, they are ideally suited for subjects like history, which involve extensive reading, writing, and research work.

With features such as online libraries, online submissions, and downloadable lectures, students can access learning resources according to their convenience. Most online programs also facilitate interactions between faculty members and students through communication tools, such as videoconferencing, email, web-based lectures, bulletin boards, and chat rooms.

To know more about the various industries and positions for history majors, browse through the visual below:

Sources

  • Archivists, Curators, and Museum Workers, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Bureau of Labor Statistics,https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/curators-museum-technicians-and-conservators.htm – tab-1, accessed November 2018
  • Archivists, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2017, Occupational Employment Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics,https://www.bls.gov/oes/2017/may/oes254011.htm
  • Curators, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2017, Occupational Employment Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics,https://www.bls.gov/oes/2017/may/oes254012.htm
  • Postsecondary Teachers, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Bureau of Labor Statistics,https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/postsecondary-teachers.htm – tab-6, accessed November 2018
  • History Teachers, Postsecondary, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2017, Occupational Employment Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics,https://www.bls.gov/oes/2017/may/oes251125.htm

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What Can I Do With A Degree In Cybersecurity?

A 2017 study conducted by Accenture shows that the average cost of cybercrime incurred by organizations to manage incidents or recover from the damage done to their business after a cybercrime has been committed is estimated to be $11.7 million a year, and this cost is expected to grow 22.7 percent a year.

With the threat of cyberwarfare constantly looming, there’s a pressing need to train new digital crime fighters who can shield government, business and personal networks from crippling online attacks.

If you are interested in this challenging field but don’t have the time for a traditional, on-campus education, you’ll find the flexibility of an online information systems security degree, also known as cybersecurity degrees, a good way to balance work and life, while still being able to earn that degree you long for.

What to Look for in an Online Cybersecurity Degree Program?

Many universities and colleges are now featuring dedicated online information systems security degree programs, either as standalone majors or concentrations within their business, computer science, or IT programs. Others are diving even deeper with programs in areas like digital forensics and application security. Depending on your professional interest, you can choose from online cybersecurity degree programs at the associate, bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degree level.

Some institutions have been recognized by the National Centers of Academic Excellence (CAE), a program jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the National Security Agency. CAE recognizes and designates certain two- and four-year institutes as centers of academic excellence in cyberdefense. Earning an online cybersecurity degree from a college or university recognized as a CAE in cyberdefense is something you’ll want to think about as it can give you a competitive edge when you enter the job market.

Apart from CAE recognition, you’ll want to look for online cybersecurity degree programs that offer a holistic approach to the subject of information security systems. Programs that don’t merely focus on security systems but also emphasize management skills, computer science, technical and legal issues related to information security systems can help mold your professional profile.

Careers after a Degree in Cybersecurity

Typically, entry in this field requires a bachelor’s degree in information systems security with some amount of experience in the field. Some of the more common occupations in this field include information security analysts, information assurance managers, penetration testers, firewall engineers, or computer forensic analysts. Responsibilities can include researching new cybersecurity trends, watching networks for signs of cyberattacks, analyzing information systems, and creating security policies.

Job Outlook (2016 to 2026, BLS)

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job outlook for information systems analysts is projected to grow 28 percent from 2016 to 2026. This is much faster than the average for all occupations and 15 percent higher than other computer occupations.

  • Information systems analysts – 28 percent growth
  • Computer occupations – 13 percent growth
  • Average for all other occupations – 7 percent growth

Earning Potential (May 2016, BLS)

Information systems analysts are amongst the highest paid in the IT industry.In May 2016, information systems security analysts earned

  • $53,760 (lowest 10 percent)
  • $92,600 (annual mean wage)
  • More than $147,290 (highest 10 percent)

Best Industries for Cybersecurity Analysts (annual mean wages, BLS 2016)

  • Wholesale Electronic Markets and Agents and Brokers – $130,740
  • Securities and Commodity Contracts Intermediation and Brokerage – $112,390
  • Advertising, Public Relations, and Related Services – $111,010
  • Newspaper, Periodical, Book, and Directory Publishers – $110,640
  • Commercial and Service Industry Machinery Manufacturing – $110,170

Best States for Cybersecurity Analysts (annual mean wages, BLS 2016)

  • District of Columbia – $123,850
  • New York – $115,690
  • New Jersey – $113,990
  • California – 108,780
  • New Mexico – $107,900

For those who love problem-solving and a good challenge, a job fighting cybercrime can regularly bring fresh challenges in this ever-changing age of technology. To learn more about where an online cybersecurity degree could take you, check out the infographic below.

Sources: 2017 Cost of Cybercrime Study: Insights on the Security Investments that Make a Difference, Ponemon Institute LLC and Accenture, 2017. https://www.accenture.com/t20170926T072837Z__w__/us-en/_acnmedia/PDF-61/Accenture-2017-CostCyberCrimeStudy.

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What Can I Do With A Degree In Environmental Engineering?

During our brief existence on Earth, we humans haven’t exactly been the best house guests. Our agricultural missteps have created a summertime dead zone the size of Connecticut along the Gulf of Mexico, practically turned Kazakhstan’s Aral Sea into a kiddie pool, and played a part in the U.S.’s “The Dust Bowl.” And that’s without touching catastrophes like oil spills.

Yet not all of our handiwork causes the planet harm. There are those who dedicate their professional lives to protecting it, and among them, environmental engineers may be some of the most fascinating. They devise manmade solutions that actually benefit the environment, whether they help contain major oil spills, design more efficient recycling methods, manufacture the next best electric car, or even create bridges that help animals safely cross highways.

The good news is that many schools across the country offer an online environmental engineering degree. Typically, these degree programs can be completed fully online and are usually preferred by students who want to balance work, life, family and other interests.

What to Look for in an Online Environmental Engineering Degree

If you’ve got a mind for logic and a soft spot for Mother Nature, earning a degree in environmental engineering could be your calling. Based on your professional interests, you can find an online environmental engineering degree from the associate to doctoral level.

Look for schools offering environmental engineering degree programs that are accredited and on par with traditional on-campus programs in terms of academic rigor. Accreditation is important when choosing any degree program. Not only does an accredited degree program open up the chance for you to receive federal funds, if you qualify but accredited programs can make you more competitive in the employment market since employers generally prefer students who have graduated from an accredited program. The most common accreditation for an environmental engineering degree is Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Graduating with an ABET-accredited degree in environmental engineering can also qualify you to take the Fundamentals of Engineering examination, one of the prerequisites to becoming a licensed Professional Engineer (PE).

Careers in Environmental Engineering

Depending on your major, careers in environmental engineering can range from being an environmental engineering technician to top management positions in this field. Typical responsibilities can include collecting and evaluating water and air samples, designing systems and projects to help protect the environment, conducting environmental research and directing environmental engineering projects.

Best Industries for Environmental Engineers

As per BLS, here are the top 5 industries in the field:

IndustriesAnnual Mean Wages
Aerospace Product and Parts Manufacturing$110, 310
Waste Collection$108, 540
Chemical Manufacturing$107, 360
Oil and Gas Extraction$107, 140
Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing$106, 510

Top-paying States for Environmental Engineers

Annual mean wages

StateAnnual mean Wages
Alaska$116, 680
Louisiana$108, 980
California$105,480
Texas$102, 660
Maryland$102, 650

It’s interesting to note that compared to other engineering degree programs, environmental engineering has the highest number of enrollments by women.

Learn more about environmental engineering degrees, schools and the careers they could lead to in our infographic below.

Please consult the visual for a full list of sources.

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What Can You Do With A Degree In Business?

Some college degrees have more clear-cut paths to careers than others. A degree in business might initially seem like a broad major, but a closer look reveals that the numerous options business degree holders have may leave them spoiled for choice!

The variety of business-related occupations and opportunities for career growth make this degree the most popular. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2015-16, a business degree was the most awarded bachelor’s and master’s degree in the country. The reasons behind the popularity of this field can range from globalization and a growing economy to the complexity of tax rules and regulations and the increased use of big data in creating data-driven market strategies.

Careers with a business degree

The diversity of the skill set acquired during the course of study allows business majors to pursue a variety of jobs including positions in accounting, human resources, research and analysis, and financial advising. Analytical thinking, communication, problem-solving abilities, and time-management are the versatile skills that may translate into job stability.

Careers in the field of business are continually adapting and changing to suit the needs of consumers and clients providing for competitive salaries and job growth, making a degree in business a smart move depending on one’s career aspirations.

Potential earnings with a business degree

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, many business-related occupations recorded higher earnings than those for all other workers. Apart from potential earnings, prospective students may want tolook at projected job outlooks as well before making a career choice. Typical jobs for business majors are:

Personal financial planners/advisors

  • Projected job growth: 15 percent (2016-26)
  • Mean annual wage: $124,140

Accountant and auditors

  • Projected job growth: 10 percent (2016-26)
  • Mean annual wage: $77,920

Market research analysts

  • Projected job growth: 23 percent (2016-26)
  • Mean annual wage: $71,450

The projected job growth for careers with business degrees between 2016 and 2026 is consistently above average – the careers listed in this infographic boast between 10 percent and 23 percent job growth by 2026.

Online Business Degree Options

Online business degree programs make it possible for those who are working or have familial or other responsibilities to earn a degree and enhance their candidacy for better-paying jobs. Earning a business degree allows you to specialize further, should you so desire, by pursuing an online master’s in finance, accountancy, business administration, or management.

Please reference the infographic for a full list of sources.

Sources:

  1. Undergraduate Degree Fields, National Center for Education Statistics, Updated March 2018, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cta.asp
  2. Graduate Degree Fields, National Center for Education Statistics, Updated March 2018,https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_ctb.asp
  3. Business and Financial Occupations, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Bureau of Labor Statistics, April 2018,https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/home.htm?view_full

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Methodologies and Sources