Psychology Career

Psychology consistently remains one of the most popular degrees on U.S. college campuses. Are they practical for career-minded students?

Psychology degrees are indeed practical. For many, a degree in psychology is an important stepping stone to a career or more education. Here are a few career paths taken by those with psychology degrees.

Psychologist

You can study psychology as an undergraduate and go on to graduate study in psychology to pursue a career as a psychologist. If you are interested in counseling people, you may only need a master’s degree in psychology. For research and teaching positions, a PhD degree is probably required.

Attorney

Many attorneys, particularly those who seek trial work, are drawn to the study of psychology. Knowing how people think and how their emotions and experience may influence their decisions can be helpful to an attorney who is addressing a jury or choosing jurors to serve on a trial. A lawyer may get a bachelor’s degree in psychology before going on to law school.

Market Research Analyst

Since much of marketing involves understanding a particular group’s preferences and the factors that influence their decisions, many interested in marketing and sales work pursue degrees in psychology. What is more, psychology degree programs will expose you to methods of research and statistical analysis, skills that are very useful in marketing careers.. Those interested in marketing might pursue a bachelor’s degree in psychology and take some business classes as electives. They might also go on to pursue a master’s in business administration.

Market research is not only useful in the business arena, but in public policy as well. You might work for a policy oriented market research firm in Washington, DC, canvassing public opinion on recent legislation or policy proposals relating to important issues like health care, social security, and welfare.

Political work can also attract those with psychology degrees. Those interested in entering politics might try getting a dual degree in psychology and journalism or English literature or communications. The combined skills of understanding how people think and constructing relevant messages to them can be very valuable in political work.

As you can see, the options available to psychology majors are diverse and numerous–the biggest challenge lay in finding the path that’s right for you.